My Awesomely Random Life (and Everything in Between)

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I love school. In fact, if I could get paid to be a forever student, I think I would. Epic nerd status, I know. In fact, I think that’s a big reason why I became a librarian; I literally get to surround myself with opportunities to learn something new everyday. I also have the chance to pass on some of that nerd-energy to my students, getting them psyched up about their education.

It’s kind of really awesome, guys.

That being said however, there were some classes that I had to take in college that did not make a mole hill of sense. I mean yes, I understand that Calculus is relatively important, and okay Biology is good to know from time to time, but what about the classes that help us young adulting adults navigate the every days and every nights IRL, the classes that will help prepare us for whatever life throws our way outside the confines of the campus quad.

Here are just some of the college classes [that need to exist yesterday] that might actually help you survive in the real world.

  1. Sociology 171: How to Make Friends Sober
  2. Communication Studies 10: How to Say No To Things You Actually Don’t Want to Do
  3. History 103: How To Recover From Accidentally Liking Someone’s Instagram Picture From 2010
  4. Cosmetology 101: How To Look Like You Weren’t Just Crying In The Bathroom
  5. Life After Your Meal Plan: How To Eat On A Budget
  6. Poli Sci 50: Policies For When Your Psychotic Roommate Keeps Stealing Your Stuff (Those Oreos Didn’t Eat Themselves, Angela!)
  7. Chemistry 20: Convincing Your Hook Up That You Two Have A Stronger Connection Than Just “Netflix And Chill”
  8. European History: How To Not Be Intolerably Annoying When You Come Back From Studying Abroad
  9. English 114: Analyzing and Interpreting Drunk Texts From Your Ex
  10. Criminal Law: How To Stop Yourself From Watching 37 Hours of Law & Order: SVU
  11. Astronomy 29: Understanding That Your Zodiac Sign Doesn’t Actually Control Your Life
  12. Theater 141: How To Feign Confidence In ALL Situations
  13. Economics 102: Understanding That If You Stopped Buying Drunk Food After You Go Out You Could Actually Afford To Go Grocery Shopping
  14. Intro To Psychology: Analyzing Different Meanings Behind The “K” Text
  15. Business: How To Fake Being Ready For A Real Career In A Job Interview When In Reality You Spent The Last Four Years Of College Signing Up For 3pm Classes Because You Hate Waking Up Before Noon
  16. Musicology 109: Finding Emergency Cool Playlists To Put On Your Phone Just In Case Someone Asks You To DJ Or When Driving In A Car Because The Last Time That Happened All You Had Downloaded Was The “Shrek” Soundtrack

QOTD: What are some of the classes you wished you had in college?

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For a lot of us, memories of our childhood bring up feelings of nostalgia. And for good reason. I can’t remember a time when I felt happier, care-free, just so full of hope and excitement for what the next day would bring.  As a late 20-something who has been at this whole adulting thing for quite a few years now, there’ve been many a time when I couldn’t help but stop and think how nice it would be to get back to that place. Not necessarily be a child again, but to live with this zest for life, to have that same level of excitement and pure joy for anything and everything.  In fact, I think there are quite a few lessons we can learn from the kid that still lives inside each of us.

  1. Willingness to hope

When we were kids, we weren’t afraid to hope–and even more than that, we weren’t afraid to share what we hoped for. We’d proudly tell our friends and family that we wanted to have the dual career of being Santa Claus and an astronaut when we grew up (still have got my fingers crossed for that one). As we got older however, we suddenly became more selective about what we revealed we hoped for. A little thing called rejection crept its way into our heads and with that, fear of being judged for the things we didn’t achieve, get or overcome. As if it could lessen the blow of not being accepted into the college we were most excited about, not being chosen for a job that we really wanted or being turned down upon expressing our interest in dating someone, we started to believe that hiding what we hope for is the way to protect ourselves from feeling the effects of rejection. I wish I could say haven’t done this myself, but I’m guilty.

Hiding what we hope for is one of the fastest routes to creating shame, because it leads to self-blaming, feelings of powerlessness and a victim mentality when we don’t get what we want. Hiding what we hope for also dulls our lives down to a dead heartbeat, making us unable to feel true excitement and attaching a “so what?” mentality to perseverance and hard work. Because when you spend more time telling yourself that the things you care about don’t matter, you put up more and more of a shield to your ability to be happy. It’s a risk to share with others what we most hope for, because there is always a chance we’ll be rejected, but there’s also something very courageous, liberating and ultimately intensely gratifying about it, no matter the outcome.

2. Sense of awe

When we were kids, we were impressed pretty damn easily. If you’ve ever seen a bunch of five-year olds at a magic show, you know exactly what I’m talking about. There will be no fewer than two kids trying to sneak through the guy’s travel bag of tricks; revealing a rabbit in a box that was empty five seconds ago will all but produce mass hysteria; and in general, not one ass will be planted on the floor for the entire show. As we got older, we became that adult standing in the background with arms crossed, maybe smirking, generally unmoved by what we’re seeing because we know all the secrets of the universe by this point, obviously, or at the very least, the secret behind that card trick.

I don’t know when it is exactly that we lose this sense of wonder, when we start to feel like we’ve seen and heard and experienced it all, but I think that might be one of the more damaging beliefs in the entire world. We need awe, badly. It makes us more generous, kind, cooperative, and altruistic. It makes us feel like we’re part of a collective whole; it makes us less entitled and less self-focused. Whether it’s going for a hike, sitting on a beach, listening to live music or something entirely else personal to you, do whatever it is that you need to do to experience. this sense of wonder every day.

3. Openness to love

A few years ago, I was visiting an old babysitter, who now has two young kiddos of her own. Though I hadn’t seen them in nearly a year and almost didn’t expect her daughter to remember  me, when I walked in, she immediately ran over and flung her arms around my neck without any inhibitions. I almost tripped backwards–there was some serious momentum to that hug, but that wasn’t why. Over time, I’ve noticed that I’ve become more and more closed, less and less of that child who runs over excitedly and hugs people, who shows love openly. That scared me to be honest; when is it that we learn to be so cautious about loving others? Why was it so shocking and difficult for me to receive that hug? At what point do we become so guarded, so protective, of who and what we trust? If we could tap back into that part of ourselves that gives and receives love without fear or caution, I wonder in what other ways we might become more open and free?

4. Allowing ourselves to be comforted

This is fairly similar to openness to love, but different – and important – enough that I think it deserves to be its own category. When we were kids and we fell and scraped our leg, dropped our blankie into a dirty pond or were just plain exhausted, we allowed ourselves to be comforted by others. As we got older, we learned the art of pretending to be fine, of pretending to not care when something hurts us. We learned to internalize and bury our pain rather than talk about it and seek comfort from those who love us in an eternal effort to never be seen as “weak.” There’s a lot to be said about our ability to comfort ourselves – it’s part of growing up and fostering our independence – but there’s also something very important and very undervalued in our society about asking for help when you need it and letting others in when you’re hurting. It’s interesting just how willing we often are to talk about the times that we comfort others, but just how unwilling we are to admit that we’d like to feel comforted sometimes too. Next time you find yourself feeling hurt or upset, it’d be if anything an interesting experiment to see what it might be like to allow yourself to be comforted like you did as a kid, rather than trying to go at it all by yourself.

5. A bedtime

Sort of kidding but not really at all. There’s something to be said about having some structure and stability to our lives. Also something to be said for 8 hours of z’s (and not going to work the next day as a cast member from the Walking Dead).

6. Letting our creative flags fly

As kids, we didn’t look at the Crayola 64 pack (complete with sharpener, yes) and say, “Oh, no, thanks anyway, but I’m not creative.” We sat down and got our serious color on! As adults, however, we learned to divide ourselves and others into two camps of people: those who “are creative” and those who aren’t. I think this is possibly the biggest load of horseshit out there. Merriam Webster defines creativity simply as “the ability to create.” Just by being human, you possess the ability to create. It’s freeing, it’s fun and it gets us closer and closer to our true self, rejecting the believed need for constant comparison between ourselves and others. Through whatever form of “creating” most speaks to you, by tapping back into that creativity that you so enthusiastically explored as a kid – and by simply being you, with all of your nuances and abilities and imperfections – you’ll be bringing something to the world that no one else can offer. That’s powerful.

7. Honesty

We didn’t learn to lie until we learned shame and consequences, because before then, we didn’t know that we’d ever need to lie. Over time, we became hardened and guarded, learning how, when and why to be dishonest. Maybe we viewed it as protecting others or protecting ourselves; maybe it was how we learned to get ourselves out of sticky situations. But a careful consideration of our tendencies when it comes to dishonesty might be the thing that helps us get back to that more pure, optimistic and liberated state that we associate with kids. What in our lives now makes us feel like we need to lie? Who do we tend to lie to? Others? Ourselves? Do our lies tend to help or do they tend to hurt? What might happen if we just became more honest?

8. Playtime

Playtime is hugely important to our happiness and yet it’s often the first thing to go for many adults. We’re so busy trudging through to-do lists in our jobs and at home that to make time for play is basically unfathomable; after all, playing doesn’t produce anything of value and we’re living in a “time is money” world. But when we don’t set aside time to do things that are nothing but fun for us like we once did as kids – when we lose our willingness to be silly – we’re missing out on a major part of our lives. (Not to mention we’re sacrificing the kind of energy and joy and excitement that we can bring to the tasks we have on those to-do lists, so if you were feeling skeptical about getting away from that pile of work you have for an hour, now you know why you downright need to go run around on an adventure.)

9. Curiosity

Before we learned that knowledge was something that would be tested, we wanted to know things purely out of curiosity. We weren’t learning for the sake of a GPA or to drop facts in some insecure attempt to impress others. We just wanted to know things – a lot of things. And maybe over time we retained that curiosity, that desire to know. Or maybe we lost some of that as we became more and more wrapped up by all the things that we were told we had to know. What would get you excited to know again? What would make you approach your world with a more child-like curiosity?

10. The occasional act of rebellion

A little (legal) rebellion can be good for us. As kids we knew this. My friends and I snuck into the movies; we ate tubs of icing in a closet; we used all the lemonade mix in the kitchen for lemonade stands, broke tables by dragging them out to the sidewalk and generally ended up drinking all of it ourselves and being wired till midnight – so on and so forth. Half of the time our parents were probably ready to put us on the curb with a “FREE” sign strapped around our necks, but at least we were pushing boundaries. A little rebellion is fun, it’s exhilarating and it definitely teaches us a few things, at the very least about who we are and what we’re willing to try. It makes us a little bit braver, a little more courageous. As we get older and filter into adult life though, with its obligations and expectations of us, we start to rebel less and less and conform more and more. Part of that’s probably because the part of our brain that houses our rationality complex is finally fully developed by 25 (which is to say that it’s probably a good thing), but maybe another part of it is just that we start to forget what it was like to live a little on the edge, to push ourselves outside of our comfort zones. I’m not sure what the adult equivalent of running away from home would be (please don’t not show up at work after reading this), but I think you should go do that. A little bit of it. Occasionally.

11. Living in the now

When we were little, we ran around without much worry as to the future or anxiety over the past, living fully and in the now, and maybe that’s because at that point we hadn’t yet developed an ego. I think the ego is that fear-driven place inside us that tells us that we’re not good enough, that taking a risk might not pay off, that cautions us from getting hurt and tells us to avoid, to back away. So we spend years learning to be afraid, and then, maybe sometime in our early adult life, we realize that it’s our job to unlearn that a little if we ever want to be happy, if we ever want to again be able to live fully in the now. Maybe it’s in living in the now that we allow ourselves to wake up every day and discover what life at our most alive really means.

12. Authenticity

As kids, we may not have been fully developed, rational, introspective human beings, but we were very much our authentic selves. After all, we hadn’t yet learned what was “cool” and “uncool.” We hadn’t yet learned that there’s such thing as social hierarchy. We hadn’t yet learned that you might have to actually work to simply belong. We hadn’t yet learned to be worried about how we’ll be perceived, that we might need to control and measure our actions against the behaviors of others to make sure that we’re safe and in line with those around us. As we get older – as we become all of these things – we tend to get further and further from who we really are. What might we be like if we tapped back into that place inside of us that lives more by what we love than what we’ve learned we should love? What might we feel towards ourselves and towards others? How might that kid inside each of us come through?

Who knew that our childhood-selves were so damn wise?!

Netflix and Chill, Or……

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Hey ladies and gents! It’s FRIDAYYYYYY which means a couple of things: donuts in the office breakroom, a pregnant bank account (hey payday, hey!) and that the next 52-ish hours are yours for the taking. The weekend is right around the corner friends, and you can spend it however your heart damn well desires. For me, that usually includes some QT with my bestest pals, brunch, hiking/biking/runs in the park, some QT with a good book, a spontaneous road trip to a quaint Colorado town, some QT with a pizza the size of my face, and of course, Netflix.

Oh Netflix. How I love you. But kind of hate you at the same time. I promise that I will only watch one, maybe three episodes tops. Six hours (and a pizza the size of my face) later, I’m still sitting there asking myself if Buffy will ever get together with Angel (I know I am like, 15 years late to the game here so please, no spoilers. BUT DO THEY GET TOGETHER OR NOT?!?!).

Instead of timesucking these precious 52-ish hours away, I’m taking a vow this weekend to nix the ‘Flix. And you should too! Here are just a few things that we all could do this weekend that will leave feeling happier and more relaxed come that dreaded Monday morning.

  1. Clean out your damn closet. Like, hardcore purge. Resist the urge to come up with bizarre situations in which you will need that one top you haven’t touched in three years, and just toss it instead. Be ruthless. You’ll realize you just wear the same ten things anyways.
  2. When you’re finished cleaning out your closet, make a stop at Plato’s Closet or your nearest Goodwill and donate the rest. You’ll feel super dupes great about giving your clothes away to people who could really use them, and you’ll also get a solid $8 back from Plato’s when you hand them over those fifteen skirts from American Eagle you wore in middle school.
  3. Get a massage. Confession: I’ve never had a massage, partly because you’re basically half-naked on a table, and mostly because I have this weird fear of man-handed Viking women karate-chopping my back to oblivion. But there’s no time like the weekend to get over ridiculous irrational fears, right?! Schedule your appointment for Saturday morning. It’ll force you to not drink on Friday night. Because puking onto the floor through that face hole thingy on the massage table is kind of frowned upon in spas.
  4. Go to one of the local community events in your area. One of the best things I love about living in Denver is that there is ALWAYS something going on, particularly in the late summertime. Outdoor movies, food festivals, Shakespeare in the park, it runs the gamut. The best part? Most of these activities are free. Music to my cheap ass ears. Not sure what’s going on in our area? Just Google it. Chances are you’ll find something awesome!
  5. Get some creative writing done. You can finally crack open that moleskin notebook you bought six months ago when you were going through that whole creativity phase.
  6. Check out the museum. Any museum–a history museum, a nature museum, an art museum, whatever. They’re pretty much always free. Bonus points: you can feel really smart when people ask you what you did over the weekend.
  7. Have your friends over for a game night. Everyone will be secretly excited, trust me. Don’t be afraid to bring out the adult beverages of your choice because let’s face it, Monopoly is boring without wine. Buy a block of cheese, cut it into squares and put it on a plate with some crackers. Your friends will think you’re not doing too shabby at this whole adulting thing.
  8. Try out the Rosetta Stone program you bought three years ago. Maybe you’ll only get through half of one lesson. But still, you opened the program! That’s a start. Congratulations. Bonjour.
  9. Get your Spotify playlists together. Because let’s face it; they’re total shit right now.
  10. Make kale chips as a light, healthy alternative snack. And when they don’t satisfy your craving, eat everything else in your house, including the kitchen sink sponge.
  11. Build a fort with your significant other. It’ll be sweet. And probably really comfortable. Instagram it or it doesn’t count.
  12. Put on cute workout clothes. And then walk to Chipotle.
  13. Wash your bedsheets. It’s been an inappropriately long time.
  14. Go to a pet shelter. Even if you don’t plan on adopting an animal, it’s a good idea to do the research now in case you want to get a dog in the future. (I’m projecting here.)
  15. Speaking of animals, go to the zoo. Most zoos are free. Plus, it’ll reconnect you with your Lion King-obsessed past and will make you feel less guilty about never going outside.
  16. Visit a used bookstore. They have plenty of relatively recent stuff, and the prices are fantastic. The perfect excuse to buy just all of the books. *The fact that it’s a day ending in ‘y’ makes it a good enough reason to buy just all of the books in my, well, book.
  17. Call your mom. She hasn’t heard from you in three days and wants to make sure that you washed your bedsheets.

In honor of National Dog Day (which in my opinion should all day, errr day), I thought I’d share with you guys some crazy awesome and kinda, sorta, really surprising facts about our favorite furry and four-legged friends.

  1. Dogs poop in strict alignment with the Earth’s south-south magnetic field. A 2013 study that examined “70 dogs” and “1,893 defecations” concluded that dogs always align their bodies with the Earth’s north-south axis when taking a poop. Humans don’t defecate with nearly the same amount of geomagnetic precision. *Humans except me of course
  2. Two dogs, 6 years, 66,000 puppies. If you took one male and one female dog and never neutered them or any of their descendants, that pair would be responsible for producing 66,000 puppies in only six years. That is a lot of puppies! And a lot of action!
  3. Dogs can fall in love just like humans do. Oxytocin—known variously as the “love hormone” and the “cuddle hormone”—is released by dog brains too. It enables them to fall in love with both dogs and humans. Aweeee!t4
  4. They can actually smell how you’re feeling. Dogs have millions more scent receptors than humans do, and they are able to detect subtle changes in your perspiration’s chemical composition that reveal your emotional state. If you don’t want them to know how you’re feeling, maybe you should shower every once in a while. Just saying.
  5. Dogs are capable of deception. According to canine-intelligence expert Stanley Coren, “They can also deliberately deceive, which is something that young children only start developing later on in their life. Psh. And you thought only the guys on Tinder were liars!
  6. They can read your motions merely by looking at your face. Besides humans, dogs are the only mammals in the animal kingdom who are able to determine your mood simply by your facial expressions. Cats not only aren’t able to tell—they wouldn’t even care if they could.
  7. They have magical [Harry Potter] powers that enable them to predict the future. Dogs can tell that a storm is coming an hour before you’re standing there soaked in the rain because you forgot to bring your umbrella. Again.
  8. The world’s biggest pet collector owned 5,000 dogs. Mongolian emperor Kublai Khan was said to have owned 5,000 Mastiffs, which would have easily qualified him to be on a modern episode of Hoarders. He was also living out my dream.
  9. The smallest dog ever…According to The Guinness Book of World Records, a two-year-old Yorkshire Terrier in Great Britain weighed only four ounces and stood a mere 2.5 inches tall at the shoulder. What a tiny little monster!
  10. The oldest dog ever…In 2013, a Louisiana beagle/terrier mix named Max died just 83 days short of his 30th birthday. That’s equivalent to 210 human years!
  11. Their paws really do smell like Frito’s. I knew it! The reason for this is that dogs only sweat between their paw pads. The sweat gets mixed up with dirt, which leads to bacteria growth, which in turn makes their paws smell like everyone’s favorite corn chip.
  12. Their owners can be sickeningly sweet and sappy. Four-fifths of dog owners buy their pets presents for holidays and birthdays. Seventy percent of them sign their dog’s name on greeting cards. Sixty percent of them even pose with their dogs for family portraits. And a full third of dog owners “talk” to their dogs on the phone or leave voicemail messages for them while they’re away. I am certain NOT one of these people. *I am the BIGGEST one of these people in the history of ever.t5
  13. All dogs are descended from a 40-million-year-old tree-dwelling weasel. That’s right. I said weasel. All modern dogs can trace their ancestry back to a “weasel-like animal” known as the Miacis. This odd little tree-dwelling creature is the forebearer of the wolf and jackal. All modern dogs share 99.9% of their DNA with wolves, who started intermingling with humans around 12,000 years ago. You may not realize it, but there’s a wild savage beast sleeping in your den right now. The more you know.
  14. They are able to smell prostate cancer with 98% accuracy. Don’t even ask how this is achieved, because I’m already traumatized by the mental images. But not only can dogs sniff out various cancers, they can tell when their owner is going to have a seizure about 45 minutes before the event, which in many cases can be life-saving. Just another reason why dogs are the bestest.
  15. Dogs wag their tails to the left when scared and to the right when happy. And they wag them low when they’re scared and fast when ready to attack.
  16. They are as smart, if not smarter than two-year-old children. The average dog can understand around 150 words. They can also count up to five. And unlike human children, it takes less than two years to potty-train them.
  17. Dogs are born deaf, toothless and blind. All puppies are born without hearing, without sight, and without teeth. What’s miraculous is that despite all this, they choose to go on living. Your biggest source of inspiration is sitting on your lap at this very moment, just waiting for you to drop your sandwich.
  18. They can get super jelly just like humans do. A study at UC San Diego showed that when a dog’s owner showed affection to a stuffed animal, the dogs would get more aggressive and display more attention-seeking behavior toward their owners.
  19. Dogs are able to dream as vividly as humans. When you see your dog twitching and whimpering while asleep and suspect that he’s dreaming, you’re probably right. Brain-wave tests on sleeping dogs are remarkably similar to those of humans. Bet you didn’t know that. What you probably also didn’t know is that your dog also constantly dreams of Chris Hemsworth swooping in on a white horse and asking him/her to run away with him. t2
  20. The smaller the dog, the longer the life. In general, those tiny yippy lapdogs live about twice as long as those massive dinosaur-like Great Danes and Mastiffs. Canine longevity is also correlated to snout length—flat-faced breeds such as pugs and bulldogs tend to die younger than dogs with long noses.
  21. Media still discriminates against female dogs. Call it the “Glass Kennel.” The “male” dog Toto in The Wizard of Oz was played by a female Cairn Terrier named Terry. The “male” Taco Bell dog is a female Chihuhua named Gidget. This reminds me of how guys used to play all the male and female roles in Shakespeare plays. When will this sexist madness end?
  22. The dog days of summer. This term dates back to the Roman Empire, when Sirius—the “dog star,” not the satellite radio channel—typically rose from around July 3 to August 11.t3
  23. Guys with dogs are three times more likely to get a girl’s digits. Fellas, take note. The British Psychological Society published a 2000 study that revealed walking with your dog triples the amount of social interactions you have. It also makes you three times more likely to walk away with a girl’s phone number than if you’d been walking alone. I totally agree. There is something about a guy with a dog that makes me melt. Bonus points if he just happens to be Chris Hemsworth.
  24. Nearly 100,000 Americans visit the hospital every year after tripping on their dog or their dog’s toys. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported that an average of 86,629 Americans visit the emergency room each year after a fall caused by pets or their pets’ playthings. It was the Kong, with the peanut butter, in the kitchen!
  25. I really do have the best one of them all. :) Dogs can bring so much unconditional joy and love into your every days and every nights. They have this uncanny way of making you feel better by simply just being their zany, crazy selves. If you have had or have a dog like my Thunder in your life, consider yourself one of the lucky ones. My heart has never been so full and my smiles and laughter have never been so great. Thunder balls, I love you buddy!t1

“Life’s tough; get a helmet.”

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Okay, so I technically learned that from watching Boy Meets World on the repeat when I was 15 yesterday. But Eric Matthews was right. Life is though. It’s so incredibly exciting and amazing and surprising and ridiculously awesome. But it can also most definitely be tough.

In my 28 years thus far, here are some of the stupidly useful things I’ve learned about life that have helped me get through those tough times looking somewhat less stupid.

  1. Opening a credit card in order to build up your credit is a smart thing to do. But you’ll probably get turned down multiple times because you don’t have any credit yet. Welcome to adulting my friends.
  2. Speaking of finances, having a separate savings account for money that you will have to spend on other people’s weddings and/or baby showers seems, at times, more fiscally practical than starting a 401K.
  3. When you’ve finally, FINALLY achieved an empty inbox, do not forget to celebrate the blissful beauty of it all. Because it will only last for eleven seconds before you get a spam email offering half-priced coupons for motor oil and a free consultation with a psychic reader. 
  4. Ads that pop up on the side of your Facebook page function as both a way to sell products and as a way to shame you for their weird Google searches you’ve made recently.
  5. Frozen knock-off grocery store brand pizza and a Die Hard DVD are the only ways to have a successful New Year’s Eve.
  6. If someone says, “Deep down, he/she is a good person,” it means that person actually sucks.
  7. If someone says, “That’s hilarious” after you tell them a story, they weren’t listening to anything you just said.
  8. Your relationship will reach a new level of intimacy when you eat a burrito in front of your SO without thinking twice about how unattractive you look with guac and beans all over your face.
  9. The person who says they’ll only eat one piece of pizza when you’re putting in the group order is actually the one you have to watch out for. “I’ll just have one little piece.” NO YOU WILL NOT KAREN YOU LIAR!
  10. If you’re ever feeling down about your relationship, turn on HGTV for a few minutes and watch unhappy couples passive-aggressively speak to each other while trying to conceal their rage. It’ll make you feel just soooo much better.
  11. Don’t wear unique or recognizable shoes to work. Your coworker in the stall next to you will know that you’re the one “keeping up your regularity”  in there and no one wants that. No one.
  12. When I drink coffee, I either get too ambitious and try to drink it while it’s molten lava hot, or I wait too long and it’s cold. There is no in between.
  13. “One more episode” is universal for five more episodes.
  14. If your friend texts you that they’re ten minutes away, they just got out of the shower.
  15. Marilyn Monroe did not say nearly as many of those quotes as I thought she did.
  16. Hanger is not joke, guys. It’s a very real thing with very real consequences (just ask those poor HGTV couples). The only way to fight it is to order a large rotisserie chicken as an appetizer when you go out to dinner with friends.
  17. Speaking of food, pasta is the only home-cooked meal that you can absolutely not. f*ck. up.
  18. If you screw up pasta, give up cooking forever and go home. If you’re already in your home, find a new home.
  19. Appreciate the leggings-are-pants trend for as long as you possibly can. You’ll never know the good you had right in front of you until it’s gone.
  20. Sneezing while driving is the most terrifying experience anyone will ever, ever, ever have.
  21. On a similar page, trying to take off your jacket while driving is the most ridiculously difficult thing you will ever, ever, ever do.
  22. If you decide to talk on the phone on public transportation, just know that ever person is listening (and now knows the real reason why Jack/Jill broke up with you. You were just too damn hangry, weren’t you?)
  23. Receiving mail with a hand-written address on the front is one of the most exciting things in the world! But it will end up being a “time to make your yearly appointment” reminder from your dentist.
  24. If someone is telling you a story and you accidentally zone out, just say, “That’s hilarious!”
  25. There is nothing, NOTHING, that a bowl of ice cream can’t fix/cure. I’m pretty sure it’s science.

QOTD: What are some of the stupidly useful things you’ve learned about life so far?

Friday Faves

Happy Friday, guys – welcome to the weekend!

As I mentioned earlier, this week I started noticing a change in the air. One of my best friends who works in the school system, went back to work after having the summer off, and that, coupled with less kids floating around the playgrounds and pools makes it feel like summer is really coming to a close. Do you feel it too? Cue eyes shut tight, fingers in my ears, and intense singing of LA LA LA!

Actually, I’m kind of excited that fall is right around the corner. But that certainly doesn’t mean that I’m wishing the good solid few weeks of summer that we have left away. No siry Bob! I will be rompering and summer dressing it up as long as I possibly can!

Luckily I still have one quintessential summer event coming my way—Labor day! This year a bunch of my friends and I are headed down south to the Great Sand Dune National Park for two solid days/nights of camping, hiking, sand surfing, eating and some QT with the besties.

AND I CANNOT WAIT!

You know what I also CANNOT wait for? This weekend. Three of my friends from Wisco recently moved out to Colorado and we all getting together tonight for some putt-putt action and then tomorrow, I taking me, myself and I to my happiest place on Earth–The Tattered Cover Bookstore. It’s been way too long since I’ve just taken a “me day”, a day to sleep as long as my growling stomach will allow, a day to read, to relax and to of course buy all of the books.

Whatever you’ve got planned for the weekend, I hope that you have a fantabulous time! But before you get a jumpstart on the fun, be sure to check out my faves from around the web and more in this week’s edition of Friday Faves!

Favorite fashion. I adore this whole fall-inspired outfit. The shirt is too cool with the fringe, and I love that bell bottoms are making a comeback…just when I got into skinny jeans. #storyofmylife ;)

Outfit

Favorite treat: Big Soft M&M Cookies. Delicious cookie pillows would have also been a good name for these babies, I think. YUM.

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Favorite DIY: DIY Shelving. I love the industrial, “I didn’t try too hard” look of these shelves, and especially how they’re styled. Awesome find!

right-shelf

Favorite Jam: I’ve always been a fan of Maroon 5 (hellllloooo Adam Levine), and I know that there V album has been out for almost a year now, but I still cannot get enough. Unkiss Me has been my jam as of late and it is all of the amazing. Obsessed.

Favorite Take Me There: Hold the phone and shut the front door. There’s an Airbnb for bookstores. IN SCOTLAND!! Yespleaseandthankyou.

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Favorite indulge: Snickers Peanut Butter Brownie Ice Cream Cake. Wow. Just, WOW!

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Favorite furball. Maddie does it again! Her caption had me cracking up: “Ahhhhh! It’s summer and I’m gonna eat all this water!” Can I join you? : )

Madddie_mini

Favorite bite: Churro Bites. Oh. Mah. Gah. I was this close to ordering a churro at Costco this week. It smelled sooo good! I got a hot dog instead. I know.

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Favorite funny. Story of my life.

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Yesterday when I woke up, there was frost on my car windows, y’all. Frost! In August!

And as weird as it sounds, I actually couldn’t have been more excited. After a long and very hot summer, I’ve been jonsin’ for cooler temps, fuzzy sweaters, and pumpkin spice anything and everything (I know. I’m one of those). Fall has definitely been and probably will always be my all-time favorite season. The changing of the leaves, the crispness of the air, and the reintroduction of sweatpants into my life makes me tres happy. Any excuse not to have to shave my legs is a great excuse in my book.

Here are some other reasons why fall is undeniably better than summer:

  1. So many crunchy leaves! It’s probably a little concerning how cathartic stepping on a perfectly crunchy leaf is. Like, Hey! Look at this beautiful piece of nature! LEMME GO OUT OF MY WAY TO STEP ON IT. Oh well. Can’t stop, won’t stop.
  2. The seasonal foods and beverages return. This isn’t some love letter to the pumpkin spice latte. However, so many other yummy treats are returning to your life in the best of ways. Like pumpkin bread. I’m a little bit in love with pumpkin bread.
  3. The month of October. There’s a reason everyone recommends traveling in October. The weather’s agreeable pretty much everywhere, and did I mention how pretty the Earth is for that miraculous month??? LOOK AT IT.
  4. Halloween! You don’t have to go trick-or-treating to love Halloween. It’s great. There’s candy. Costumes. Jack-O-Lanterns. And….
  5. Disney Channel movies!!! The ’13 Nights of Halloween’ special on Disney Channel is a special kind of miracle. Hocus Pocus, Halloweentown, Tower of Terror, Hocus Pocus… If I could summarize my childhood in one month of movies, this would be it.
  6. It’s The Great Pumpkin, Charlie Brown. Yep. Everything about this.

wwxgkad7. Beach season is over! I’m a full supporter that every body is a “beach body” simply because it’s a body and it’s on the beach. However, it’s nice to move past those hot months with their side of body shaming to the chill months of sweaters and scarves.

8. SWEATER WEATHER. Literally everyone looks great in a sweater, and they’re so comfortable! Brb, taking a nap standing up because I’m just that cozy all the time in my sweater.

9. TV shows are finally returning! We’ve been waiting in agony for MONTHS to find out what’s happening on How To Get Away With Murder and with fall comes all the TV. I’VE MISSED YOU, SHONDA.

10. Corn mazes are surprisingly fun. It seems like the ultimate cliche of autumn, buuuuuut they’re fun. I’ll admit it. Especially when you get to end the maze fun with hot chocolate. And pumpkin bread.

11. ‘Fall’ as a verb is immensely better than ‘summer.’ I can’t be the only one that gets superiorly annoyed whenever someone mentions that they’re “summering” somewhere. It’s fine to say you’re going on a vacation, but summering? Really? Can you not please? Ten more points for Gryffindor fall.

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